Organic Gardening News

Spots On Hydrangea Leaves – How To Treat Hydrangeas With Leaf Spots

Organic Gardening - Tue, 2019-10-08 15:00
Hydrangeas are a favorite flowering shrub of many, with big blooms and attractive foliage. However, spots on hydrangea leaves can ruin the beauty and infect other shrubs too. Learn how to treat the hydrangea leaf spot disease and make your plant beautiful again. Leaf Spot Diseases on Hydrangeas Leaf spotting on hydrangea is mostly caused by the fungus Cercospora and affects most of this family of plants. It is common from summer through fall. The fungus exists in the soil and is moved onto the plant by overhead watering or rain. Plants are usually infected a month or two before spots appear on the leaves. Symptoms worsen during summers with heavy rainfall. Plants may flower less, with smaller blooms, and are less vigorous overall. Hydrangeas with leaf spots rarely die from the disease, but they can decline and defoliate early. The spots first occur on lower, older leaves and then

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Indirect Light Houseplants: Choosing Plants For North-Facing Windows

Organic Gardening - Tue, 2019-10-08 11:00
When growing houseplants in your home, one of the most important aspects to ensure they will thrive is placing them in the correct light. If you are looking for some great indirect light houseplants, there are plenty that you can grow. North-facing windows provide the least amount of light compared to other exposures but, luckily, you have many choices for houseplants in north-facing windows.  Choosing Houseplants for North-Facing Windows Keep in mind that no plant likes to be placed in a dark corner. There are plants that will tolerate it, but you’ll want to have your plants within a foot (30 cm.) or so away from your north-facing window. Here are some plants that like low light windows: Pothos – Pothos is a wonderful low light houseplant. You can allow the trailing vines to grow long, or if you’d like a bushier look, you can trim them back. This plant

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Container Monoculture Design – Grouping Containers Of The Same Color

Organic Gardening - Tue, 2019-10-08 07:00
Monoculture planting in pots is not new in gardening. It refers to using the same type of plants, say succulents, in one container. But now there is a new, fun trend. Garden designers are using plants of similar color and texture to produce larger-scale arrangements of containers to make a striking statement. Any home gardener can get in on the trend with just a few or several pots. What is Container Monoculture Design? Gardeners generally shy away from monoculture. It’s not considered good practice because putting the same types of plants in the same space encourages the accumulation of pests and disease particular to those plants. The difference between that traditional idea of monoculture and monoculture container groupings is that with containers you can more easily swap out diseased plants. You can also disinfect and change out pots to prevent the spread of a disease. Additionally, the new trend in

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Ornamental Grass Center Is Dying: What To Do With A Dead Center In Ornamental Grass

Organic Gardening - Mon, 2019-10-07 18:00
Ornamental grasses are trouble-free plants that add texture and motion to the landscape. If you notice the centers dying in ornamental grass, it just means the plant is getting older and a little tired. A dead center in ornamental grass is typical when plants have been around for a while. Centers Dying in Ornamental Grass The best way to prevent ornamental grass dying in middle is to divide the plant every two or three years. However, if your ornamental grass center is dying, you may need to dig and divide the entire plant. The best time to divide ornamental grass is in spring, before new growth emerges. Be sure to have a sturdy, sharp spade on hand; digging a large clump isn’t an easy task. Here’s how to go about it. Fixing a Dead Center in Ornamental Grass Water the ornamental grass thoroughly a couple of days before dividing. The

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Lowering pH Of Grass – How To Make A Lawn More Acidic

Organic Gardening - Mon, 2019-10-07 15:09
Most plants prefer a soil pH of 6.0-7.0, but a few like things a bit more acidic, while some need a lower pH. Turf grass prefers a pH of 6.5-7.0. If the lawn pH is too high, the plant will have trouble up taking nutrients and certain important microorganisms will be in short supply. Keep reading to learn how to make a lawn more acidic, or lower yard pH. Help, My Lawn pH is Too High! Soil pH is represented by a rating of 0 to 10. The lower the number, the higher the acidity. The neutral point is 7.0, and any number above this is more alkaline. Some turf grasses like a bit more acidity, such as centipede grass, but most are fine around 6.5. In high pH soils, you often need to lower yard pH. This is relatively easy but should start first with a simple soil test

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Getting Grass On A Hill – How To Grow Grass On Slopes

Organic Gardening - Mon, 2019-10-07 11:00
If you live in a hilly area, your property may have one or more steep slopes. As you’ve probably discovered, getting grass on a hill is not an easy matter. Even a moderate rain can wash the seed away, erosion leaches nutrients from the soil, and winds can dry out and compact the earth. Although growing grass on a slope is difficult, it’s not impossible. What Defines Steep Sloping Lawns? Steep sloping lawns are those that have a grade of 20% or more. A 20% grade rises one foot (.91 m.) in height for every 5 feet (1.5 m.) of distance. To put this into perspective, it’s dangerous to mow horizontally with a riding tractor on slopes with a 15% or greater grade. At this angle, tractors can overturn. In addition to mowing issues, growing grass on a slope becomes more difficult as the grade becomes steeper. Homeowners with grades

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Ornamental Grass Feeding Needs: Do Ornamental Grasses Need Fertilizing

Organic Gardening - Mon, 2019-10-07 07:00
Ornamental grasses are low maintenance perennials that add interest to the landscape year round. Because they require minimal care, a reasonable question to ask is “do ornamental grasses need fertilizing?” If so, what are the feeding needs for ornamental grass plants? Should I Feed my Ornamental Grasses? Many ornamental grasses have become popular staples in the colder hardiness zones both for their cold tolerance and visual interest throughout the fall and winter seasons. Generally, ornamental grasses are not cut back until the early spring, which allows the grassy fronds to add some aesthetic value during a time when most plants are dormant. Once established, in their second year from planting, ornamental grasses require very little maintenance beyond occasional division and cutting back or cleaning them up in the early spring. But do ornamental grasses need fertilizing? Not really. Most grasses prefer to live sparsely with fairly low levels of fertility.

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Andropogon Blackhawks Info: How To Grow Blackhawks Ornamental Grass

Organic Gardening - Sun, 2019-10-06 18:00
What is Blackhawks grass (Andropogon gerardii ‘Blackhawks’)? It’s a variety of big bluestem prairie grass, which once grew across much of the Midwest – also known as “turkeyfoot grass,” thanks to the interesting shape of the deep burgundy or purple seed heads. Growing this particular cultivar isn’t difficult for gardeners in USDA plant hardiness zones 3-9, as this tough plant requires very little care. Read on to learn more. Uses for Blackhawks Ornamental Grass Blackhawks bluestem grass is appreciated for its stature and interesting blooms. The colorful foliage is gray or bluish green in spring, morphing to green with red tints in summer, and finally ending the season with deep purple or lavender-bronze leaves after the first frost in autumn. This versatile ornamental grass is natural for prairie or meadow gardens, at the back of beds, in mass plantings, or any spot where you can appreciate its year-round color and

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Lawn Plug Aeration: When To Plug Aerate A Lawn

Organic Gardening - Sun, 2019-10-06 15:00
Lawn plug aeration is a method of removing small cores of soil from the lawn to keep the lawn and grass healthy. Aeration relieves compaction in the soil, allows more oxygen to reach the roots of the grass, and improves the movement of water and nutrients through the soil. It can also prevent the buildup of thatch, or dead grass and roots, in your lawn. Most lawns can benefit from an occasional aeration. Does My Lawn Need Plug Aeration? Essentially, all lawns need aeration at some point. It’s a good management practice that helps maintain health and strength in grassy areas. Even if your lawn is currently healthy and lush, a regular process of aerating will help keep it that way. The best way to aerate a lawn is to use a core aerating machine. This device uses a hollow tube to actually pull plugs of soil out of the

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Creeping Succulent Plants – Do Succulents Make Good Groundcover

Organic Gardening - Sun, 2019-10-06 11:00
If you are new to gardening but want to dip a toe in the waters, try growing succulents. They are utterly charming, come in a variety of sizes and colors, and have a carefree nature. In the landscape, succulent plants that spread create a carpet of texture combined with low maintenance ease. There are even hardy varieties available for northern gardeners. Do Succulents Make Good Groundcover? Trying to develop a no fuss area of the garden with weed resistant properties and a visual appeal? Need some plants that can tolerate neglect, thrive in drought, and cover an unsightly area? Try growing creeping succulent plants. Groundcover succulents might just be the answer you’re searching for. Using succulents as groundcover offers the gardener many benefits and opportunities. Not only are they forgiving, they are also adaptable and have a unique beauty not found in many other plant families. There are many species

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Small Ornamental Grass Varieties: Learn About Popular Short Ornamental Grasses

Organic Gardening - Sun, 2019-10-06 07:00
Large clumps of ornamental grass are impressive, but don’t disregard the value of low growing ornamental grasses. Available in a wide array of forms, textures, and colors, short ornamental grasses are a simple to grow and require very little maintenance. Small Ornamental Grass Varieties Like its taller cousins, small ornamental grass varieties are highly resistant to pests and disease that can overtake other, less hardy plants. They make great accents in a garden border. When planted in mass, short ornamental grasses create a ground cover that few weeds can penetrate. Below are some popular types of ornamental grass that stay small and make great additions to the landscape: Dwarf Mondo Grass (Ophiopogon spp.): This 4- to 6-inch (10-15 cm.) plant is bright green with blue flowers in the summer. Dwarf mondo grass does well in full sun or partially shaded areas. Best for USDA zones 5 through 9 with well

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What Is Begonia Pythium Rot – Managing Begonia Stem And Root Rot

Organic Gardening - Sat, 2019-10-05 18:00
Begonia stem and root rot, also called begonia pythium rot, is a very serious fungal disease. If your begonias are infected, the stems become waterlogged and collapse. Exactly what is begonia pythium rot? Read on for information about this disease and tips for treating begonia pythium rot. What is Begonia Pythium Rot? You may have never heard of begonia stem and root rot. If your begonias are infected, you’ll likely want to know more about it. This is a disease caused by the fungal-like organism Pythium ultimum. This organism lives in the soil and can subsist there for long periods of time. It is likely to become active when the ground is very wet and the weather is cool. The pathogen spores travel in water and are spread when infested soil or water is transferred to healthy areas. When begonia stem and root rot infects your plants, they are likely

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Begonia Botrytis Treatment – How To Control Botrytis Of Begonia

Organic Gardening - Sat, 2019-10-05 15:00
Begonias are among America’s favorite shade plants, with lush leaves and splashy blossoms in a multitude of colors. Generally, they are healthy, low-care plants, but they are susceptible to a few fungal diseases like botrytis of begonia. Begonias with botrytis is a serious disease that can endanger the life of the plant. Keep reading for information about treating begonia botrytis, as well as tips about how to avoid it. About Begonias with Botrytis Botrytis of begonia is also known as botrytis blight. It is caused by the fungus Botrytis cinerea and is most likely to appear when temperatures dip and moisture levels rise. Begonias with botrytis blight decline rapidly. Tan spots and sometimes water-soaked lesions appear on the foliage and stems of the plant. Cuttings rot at the stem. Established begonia plants rot as well, starting in the crown. Look for dusty gray fungal growth on infected tissue. The Botrytis

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Begonia Powdery Mildew Control – How To Treat Begonia Powdery Mildew

Organic Gardening - Sat, 2019-10-05 11:00
Begonias are among the most popular of all annual flowers. They come in a variety of types and colors, they tolerate shade, they produce both pretty blooms and attractive foliage, and they won’t be eaten by deer. Caring for begonias is pretty easy if you give them the right conditions, but watch out for signs of powdery mildew and know how to prevent and manage this disease. Identifying Powdery Mildew on Begonias Powdery mildew is a fungal infection. Begonias with powdery mildew are infected by Odium begoniae. This species of fungus only infects begonias, but it will spread readily between begonia plants. A begonia with powdery mildew will have white, powdery or thread-like growths on the top surface of leaves. The fungus may additionally cover stems or flowers. The fungus feeds from the leaf cells, and needs the plant to survive. For this reason, the infection does not kill plants,

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When To Water Dahlias: Tips For Watering Dahlia Plants

Organic Gardening - Sat, 2019-10-05 07:00
Planting dahlias in the garden is an excellent way to add dramatic color to your space. Coming in various sizes and flower shapes, it is easy to see why dahlia plants are so appealing to novice gardeners, as well as those with impressive established plantings. Since these plants will require some specialized care, it is important to become familiar with their needs. Among these include knowing how and when to water dahlias, which will help ensure success in the upcoming growing season. Should I Water Dahlia Tubers? Unlike many other garden flowers, which are grown from seed or transplant, dahlias are most commonly grown from tubers. Similar to bulbs, tubers are planted into the ground after all chance of frost has passed in the spring. Though some growers choose to pre-sprout the tubers, others may plant the dormant tubers directly into the ground. When conditions are right, growth points (“eyes”)

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Dahlia Mosaic Symptoms – Treating Dahlias With Mosaic Virus

Organic Gardening - Fri, 2019-10-04 18:00
Your dahlia is clearly not doing well. Its growth is stunted and the leaves are blotchy and twisted. You’re wondering if it’s missing some type of nutrient, but nothing seems to help. Sadly, you may be witnessing mosaic virus in dahlias. Dahlia Mosaic Symptoms Mosaic virus in dahlias cause large scale disfigurement of the plant. It is found worldwide and is spread by inoculation of the sap, either through human intervention or by the 13 species of aphids that serve as its natural vectors. Dahlias with mosaic virus can exhibit a multitude of symptoms. The severity and type of dahlia mosaic symptoms can depend upon the particular variety or cultivar: Chlorophyll loss resulting in light-colored, pale green to yellow streaks along the branch veins and midveins of the leaves. Distortion of leaf growth resulting in stunted, twisty, rolled or cupped leaves Short flower stems with reduced number of flowers and

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Dahlia Wilt Disease: How To Treat Spotted Wilt Virus In Dahlias

Organic Gardening - Fri, 2019-10-04 15:00
The spotted wilt virus in dahlias affects more than 200 species of vegetable and ornamental plants worldwide. The disease is spread only by thrips. Thrip larvae acquire the virus by feeding on host plants, like dahlias with spotted wilt disease. When the thrips mature, their ability to fly spreads the virus to healthy plants. Symptoms of Dahlia Wilt Disease Originally discovered in tomato plants, this viral disease was aptly named the tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). In tomato species, this virus causes wilting of the leaves and yellow spots on the fruit. The name of this disease can be deceptive, though, as gardeners aren’t likely to find that their dahlias are wilting. The presence of thrips on infected plants, coupled with common symptoms, is a better indicator to suspect dahlia wilt disease. Due to their small size, thrips may be hard to see. The trick is to tap the dahlia

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Italian Late Information: How To Grow Italian Late Garlic Cloves

Organic Gardening - Fri, 2019-10-04 11:00
Growing Italian Late garlic is a great way to enjoy a tasty variety of garlic while also extending your harvest. As compared to other garlic varieties, this one is ready later in the spring or summer so you can get more garlic for a longer period of time if you add it to other types in the garden. With some basic Italian Late information, you’ll find it easy to grow. What is Italian Late Garlic? Italian Late garlic is a softneck variety. This means it does not have the tough flower stalk of hardneck garlics that needs to be removed to encourage bulb development. Softnecks produce more cloves per bulb as well. The flavor of Italian Late is robust but not overly hot compared to other varieties. The taste is rich and lingers on the palate. This garlic’s aroma is very pungent. Like other types of garlic, the flavor can

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Growing Chasmanthe Plants: Learn About Chasmanthe Plant Care

Organic Gardening - Fri, 2019-10-04 07:00
Chasmanthe is a fabulous plant that is related to the iris. Chasmanthe flowers stem from frost tender bulbs and appear in summer. They come in a rainbow of colors and provide vertical interest at the back of low growing perennial beds or as ushers along a path. If you are looking for a plant that complements your water bill, look no further than Chasmanthe. This drought tolerant bulb produces eye-popping flowers in almost every hue. Keep reading for tips on how to grow Chasmanthe and what winter care might be necessary. About Chasmanthe Flowers Chasmanthe is native to South Africa and one of the true heat seeking plants. In the wild, the plant grows in rocky outcrops. Some species occur where there is plentiful rainfall, while others grow in more arid regions. Gardeners growing Chasmanthe plants in warm regions, may need to take heed, though, as the plants can become

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Aster Wilt Disease – How To Treat Aster Wilt Symptoms

Organic Gardening - Thu, 2019-10-03 18:00
Growing asters with late-season, cool weather blooms fills in garden spaces where other flowers have not made it through the summer heat. Daisy-like blossoms of the aster, sometimes called Michaelmas daisies, welcome pollinators and those tending the flower garden alike – until the gardener finds a case of aster wilt disease. Wilting asters are difficult to revive once blossoms appear and young plants with aster wilt symptoms rarely survive. Learn what you can do to save your asters in this article. What Causes Wilting Asters? Aster fusarium wilt is a fungal issue that is soilborne and may remain in your beds indefinitely. It may also come in with soil your plants are potted in. Aster wilt most often attacks those in bloom. Leaves on the bottom or one side yellow and buds and blooms drop from the infection. A brownish fungal discoloration of vascular tissue is present on the stem

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