Organic Gardening News

Plants Voles Don’t Like: Using Vole Repellent Plants In The Garden

Organic Gardening - Mon, 2019-10-28 11:05
Voles are mouse-like rodents with short, stubby tails. These troublesome little varmints do a lot of damage in a garden where they chew on foliage or tunnel under plants in search of roots and seeds. Planting an anti-vole garden is a challenge, because voles aren’t very picky about their diet. However, it is possible to plant a variety of beautiful, vole proof plants. Here are a few of the most popular plants voles don’t like. Plants Voles Won’t Eat Salvia (Salvia officinalis) has good things to offer if you’re human or even a hummingbird, but there is apparently something about the aroma that voles don’t appreciate. Salvia (available in perennial and annual forms) is most often blue or red, but you can also find varieties in pink, purple, green, white, yellow, and even brown. Hardiness of perennial salvia depends on the species, but most are suitable for growing in USDA

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Mouse Bark Damage: Keeping Mice From Eating Tree Bark

Organic Gardening - Mon, 2019-10-28 07:00
In winter, when food sources are scarce, small rodents eat what they can find to survive. This becomes a problem when your tree bark becomes a mouse meal. Unfortunately, mice chewing on trees can cause serious damage. Read on for information on mouse bark damage as well as tips on keeping mice from eating tree bark in your yard. Determining When Mice are Eating Tree Bark Trees add so much to a garden or backyard. They can be expensive to install and require regular irrigation and maintenance, but most homeowners find it well worth the trouble. When you first see mouse bark damage, you may feel that your house is under attack. Just keep in mind that small rodents need food to survive the winter too. The mice are eating tree bark as a last resort, not to annoy you. First, make certain it’s actually mice eating the tree bark.

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Plants Mice Won’t Eat – What Plants Do Mice Dislike

Organic Gardening - Sun, 2019-10-27 18:00
Mice in the garden or home, can be a major pest problem. Having plants mice won’t eat can be one solution. If there is no food source, there is no need for a mouse to hang out or make a home in your garden. Use these suggestions for plants that will be safe from nibbling mice and some that may actually help repel the critters. What Plants Do Mice Dislike? Most gardeners are concerned with bigger pests, like deer and raccoons, eating their plants or vegetable harvests. Mice can be a big issue as well. They may be small, but mice can make quick work of the plants you have worked hard to grow and nurture. Mice particularly like to nibble on bulbs you’re hoping will bloom in the spring. You may think it’s a mole or a squirrel, but oftentimes the bulb culprit ruining your spring garden is a

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Protecting Trees From Rodents: What To Do With Trees Damaged By Rodents

Organic Gardening - Sun, 2019-10-27 15:13
In winter, regular sources of food for rodents die back or disappear. That’s why you’ll see many more trees damaged by rodents in winter than during the growing season. Rodents that eat tree bark include everything from rabbits to voles. With a little effort, you can install rodent protection for trees and take steps to aid trees damaged by rodents. Read on to find out how. Rodent Tree Damage Winter is a hard time for rodents, killing off many plants that they usually eat, or else covering them up with a thick layer of snow. That’s why rodents turn to trees for food. Rodents that eat tree bark, like rabbits and mice and voles, work hard to get access to the softer, tastier inner tree bark called the cambium layer. The hungry creatures chew through the outer bark of the tree to get to this green cambium. Rodent tree damage

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Categories: Organic Gardening

Fire Cider!

Organic Gardening 2 - Sun, 2019-10-27 13:39
Posted by cookinwithherbs
This book, Fire Cider!, is hot off the presses, published by Storey Books. There are 101 zesty recipes for health-boosting remedies made with apple cider vinegar by Rosemary Gladstar and friends.
Categories: Organic Gardening

Do Mice Like Mulch: How To Get Rid Of Mice In Garden Mulch

Organic Gardening - Sun, 2019-10-27 11:00
Vermin like mice, shrews and voles can be a troublesome pest for many. The thought of these rodents is enough to make many homeowners shutter. Just as we would prefer our homes to be rodent free, preventing the presence of these nuisance animals in our gardens, yards, and flower beds is equally important. Read on for tips on preventing mulch rodent problems. Do Mice Like Mulch? Mice in the garden, as with other rodents like voles and shrews, can cause a multitude of problems. Damage to vegetable plants, fruit trees, expensive ornamentals and/or flowering bulbs can be quite costly. By familiarizing ourselves with the needs and habits of these pests, we can better prevent them from nesting in or near our homes. The main reasons in which mice invade the home landscape is to look for food and to find materials to safely build nests with. Your garden is naturally

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Greenhouse Mouse Control: How To Keep Rodents Out Of The Greenhouse

Organic Gardening - Sun, 2019-10-27 07:09
Pests in the greenhouse come in many forms. Among these are rodents (in particularly mice) in the greenhouse. It’s no wonder greenhouse rodents can become a nuisance for the gardener. It is warm inside, safe from predators, has a water source, and is a genuine smorgasbord for a hungry rodent. However, they create mayhem for the gardener. So, how can you keep rodents out of the greenhouse? Problems with Mice in the Greenhouse For those who wonder what the problem with mice in the greenhouse is, let me clue you in. Greenhouse rodents can cause lots of damage. They eat seeds, germinating or otherwise, and nibble on tender young seedlings, not just the tender seedlings, but roots, bulbs, shoots, and leaves as well. They chew through wood, plastic pots, bags, and boxes and tunnel through growing medium. They raise families, and big ones at that, urinating and defecating anywhere they

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Squash Arch Ideas – Learn To Make A DIY Squash Arch

Organic Gardening - Sat, 2019-10-26 18:00
If you grow squash in your backyard, you know what a happy mess of squash vines can do to your garden beds. Squash plants grow on strong, long vines that can crowd out your other veggie crops in short order. A squash arch can help you solve those problems and serve as a focal point in your garden too. Read on for information on squash arch ideas and tips on how to build a squash arch yourself. What is a Squash Arch? It’s not easy to grow squash vertically. Like snap peas, these veggies are heavy. Even a load of zucchini can take down a small trellis, and winter squash is even heavier. That’s why it’s time to consider a DIY squash arch. What is a squash arch? It’s an arch made of PVC piping and fencing tough enough to bear the load of a productive squash plant. Squash Arch

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What Is A Blue Hokkaido Squash: Learn About Blue Kuri Squash Care

Organic Gardening - Sat, 2019-10-26 15:00
If you love squash but want to diversify, try growing Blue Hokkaido squash plants. What is a Blue Hokkaido squash? Only one of the most prolific, multi-use winter squash varieties available, plus, it’s beautiful. Keep reading for more Blue Hokkaido info, including the growing and care of Blue Kuri (Hokkaido) squash. What is a Blue Hokkaido Squash? Blue Hokkaido, also referred to as Blue Kuri squash, is an open pollinated Japanese Kabocha type of squash that has a much longer shelf life than other types of Kabocha. Typical of Kabocha squash, Blue Hokkaido squash (Curcurbita maxima) has a flattened globe shape with as its name suggests, a blue-grey color. Additional Blue Hokkaido Info The golden flesh of Blue Kuri is sweet and can be used in dessert recipes as well as in savory/sweet side dishes. It tends to be on the dry side; however, after being stored for a few

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What Is A Sweet Dumpling Squash – Sweet Dumpling Acorn Squash Growing

Organic Gardening - Sat, 2019-10-26 11:00
If you love winter squash but find that their size is somewhat intimidating try growing Sweet Dumpling acorn squash. What is a Sweet Dumpling squash? Read on to learn about growing Sweet Dumpling squash plants. What is a Sweet Dumpling Squash? Sweet Dumpling squash is a winter squash variety that bears small individual sized acorn squash. The fruit is about 4 inches (10 cm.) in diameter, perfect for roasting whole or stuffing. The exterior is a deeply ribbed, ivory white or cream marked by dark green strips, while the interior is an incredibly sweet, tender orange color. This winter squash stores well post-harvest and is incredibly productive, generally producing 8-10 fruit per vine. It is also fairly disease resistant. Growing Sweet Dumpling Squash Plants Sweet Dumpling squash is an open-pollinated heirloom winter squash that can be grown in USDA zones 3-12. Sweet Dumpling is ready for harvest a mere three

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Buttercup Squash Facts – Learn How To Grow Buttercup Squash Vines

Organic Gardening - Sat, 2019-10-26 07:04
Buttercup squash plants are heirlooms native to the Western Hemisphere. They are a type of kabocha winter squash, also known as Japanese pumpkin, and can be stored for a long time due to their hard rinds. As the name would suggest, the flesh cooks up with a sweet buttery flavor. Buttercup winter squash needs a long growing season and plenty of sun and heat to produce the small fruits. Buttercup Squash Facts Heirloom plants are all the rage today. They allow gardeners to explore food varieties that our grandparents grew and that have time tested reliability. Buttercup squash facts indicate that the heirloom variety often develops turban-shaped fruit, an eye-appealing oddity. The fruit is an excellent source of carotenoids, an important antioxidant, and Vitamin C. The plant needs 105 days from seed to harvest. It is a sprawling, vine-like plant that requires plenty of room to grow. The fruits are

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Baby’s Breath Issues – How To Deal With Common Gypsophila Problems

Organic Gardening - Fri, 2019-10-25 18:00
The baby’s breath plant is best known for adding a little magic to floral arrangements. The small flowers and delicate leaves create an ethereal presentation. If you are thinking of planting these flowers in your backyard, you will want to learn about common problems with baby’s breath plants. Read on for a discussion of the most common Gypsophila problems. Baby’s Breath Problems Baby’s breath (Gypsophila paniculata) is an herbaceous perennial. It usually grows between 2 and 4 feet (60 and 120 cm.) tall with a similar spread. This plant has slender stems and narrow leaves, with showy white sprays of flowers. To keep baby’s breath plants happy, plant them in full sun in a site with good drainage. They need regular watering but will die if they get “wet feet.” The plants are so healthy and vital that they are considered invasive in several states, but you may encounter a

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Foxtail Palm Diseases – How To Treat Diseased Foxtail Palm Trees

Organic Gardening - Fri, 2019-10-25 15:00
Native to Australia, foxtail palm (Wodyetia bifurcata) is a lovely, versatile tree, named for its bushy, plume-like foliage. Foxtail palm grows in the warm climates of USDA plant hardiness zones 10 and 11 and struggles when temperatures fall below 30 F. (-1 C.). If you’re pondering the question, “Is my foxtail palm sick,” then you’ve come to the right place. Foxtail palm tends to be relatively problem free, but it is susceptible to certain diseases, often related to issues with care and maintenance or climactic conditions. Read on and learn more about diseases of foxtail palms. What to Do About Diseased Foxtail Palm Trees Below are common symptoms of foxtail palm diseases and how to manage them. Crown rot and root rot Symptoms of crown rot include browning or yellowing of fronds. Above ground, symptoms of root rot are similar, causing wilting and slow growth. Below ground, the roots turn

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Amaryllis Southern Blight Disease: Recognizing Amaryllis Southern Blight Symptoms

Organic Gardening - Fri, 2019-10-25 11:00
Amaryllis is a bold, striking flower that grows from a bulb. Many people grow them in containers, often in the fall or winter for late winter to early spring blooms, but amaryllis can also grow outdoors in warmer climates. Amaryllis is generally easy to grow and is not often troubled by disease, but be aware of signs of southern blight and know how to manage it. What is Amaryllis Southern Blight Disease? Southern blight of amaryllis is a fungal disease that can affect these plants. The causal agent is the fungus Sclerotium rolfsii. It also causes disease in legumes, cruciferous vegetables, and cucurbits, among many other plants you may have in your garden. There are a lot of different plants, and weeds, that can play host to the southern blight fungus. For amaryllis, you are most likely to see the disease if you grow them outdoors. Potted amaryllis plants are

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Bloody Dock Care: How To Grow Red Veined Sorrel Plants

Organic Gardening - Fri, 2019-10-25 07:00
Have you ever heard of the plant with the name of bloody dock (also known as red veined sorrel)? What is red veined sorrel? Red veined sorrel is a decorative edible that is related to French sorrel, the type that is more commonly grown for use in cooking. Interested in growing red veined sorrel? Read on to learn how to grow red veined sorrel and tips for bloody dock care. What is Red Veined Sorrel? Bloody dock plant, aka red veined sorrel (Rumex sanguineus), is a rosette forming perennial from the buckwheat family. It generally grows in a clumping mound that reaches around 18 inches (46 cm.) in height and is just as wide. Bloody dock plant is native to Europe and Asia but has naturalized in some areas of the United States and Canada. Wild growing red veined sorrel can be found in ditches, clearings, and forests. It is

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What Is Golden Club – Information About Growing Golden Club Water Plants

Organic Gardening - Thu, 2019-10-24 18:00
If you live in the Eastern United States, you may be familiar with golden club water plants, but everyone else might be wondering “what is golden club”? The following golden club plant info contains all you need to know about golden club flowers. What is Golden Club? Golden club (Orontium aquaticum) is a native herbaceous perennial in the family Arum (Araceae). This common emergent plant can be found growing in streams, swamps, and ponds. Golden club water plants grow from a vertical rhizome that has thick roots which expand and contract. These contracting roots draw the rhizome deeper into the soil. The dark green, erect, strap-like leaves of this water plant float atop the surface of the water. The foliage has a waxy texture that repels water. Golden club flowers are long and cylindrical with an inflorescence of tiny yellow flowers and born off a white, fleshy stalk. The bag-like

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Treating Glads With Fusarium: How To Control Gladiolus Fusarium Rot

Organic Gardening - Thu, 2019-10-24 15:00
Gladiolus plants grow from corms and often are planted in masses, adding upright color to beds and borders in the landscape. If the corms of your unplanted glads appear discolored and unhealthy, they may be infected with gladiolus fusarium rot. Let’s look at fusarium wilt and rot to see if your corms can be saved. Glads with Fusarium Wilt Fusarium of gladiolus is a fungus that can damage the corms you’ve stored for the winter. Spots and yellowing are the first signs of problems, turning to larger discolored areas and lesions. These eventually turn to brownish or blackish dry rot. Roots are damaged or have disappeared. Discard these. Others stored with them should be treated. Planting glads with fusarium wilt can result in yellowing foliage, sick plants and no blooms, if they sprout at all. Fusarium wilt results from soilborne Fusarium oxysporum. It affects other corms and bulbs besides gladiolus.

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Grape Cotton Root Rot – How To Treat Grapes With Cotton Root Rot

Organic Gardening - Thu, 2019-10-24 11:00
Also known as Texas root rot, grape cotton root rot (grape phymatotrichum) is a nasty fungal disease affecting more than 2,300 plant species. These include: ornamental plants cactus cotton nuts conifers shade trees Cotton root rot on grapevines is devastating for growers in Texas and much of the southwestern United States. The grape phymatotrichum fungus lives deep in the soil where it survives almost indefinitely. This type of root rot disease is extremely difficult to control, but the following information may help. Grapes with Cotton Root Rot Grape cotton root rot is active in the summer months when soil temperatures are at least 80 F.  (27 C.) and air temperature exceeds 104 F. (40 C.), usually in the months of August and September. In these conditions, the fungus invades the vines through the roots and the plant dies because it is unable to take up water. Early symptoms of cotton

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Polish Hardneck Variety: Growing Polish Hardneck Garlic In The Garden

Organic Gardening - Thu, 2019-10-24 07:00
The Polish hardneck variety is a type of porcelain garlic that is large, beautiful and well formed. It is an heirloom variety that may have originated in Poland. It was brought to the United States by Rick Bangert, an Idaho garlic grower. If you are considering planting this variety of garlic, we’ll give you information about the these hardneck garlic bulbs and tips on growing Polish hardneck garlic. What is Polish Hardneck Garlic? If you are familiar with Northern White garlic, you know how large and lovely the bulbs are. Polish hardneck garlic bulbs are just as ample and attractive. The Polish hardneck variety of garlic has a rich, musky flavor with a deep heat that has staying power. In short, Polish hardneck garlic bulbs are strong, long-storing garlic plants with heat. They harvest in summer and stay fresh until the following spring. Growing Polish Hardneck Garlic If you decide

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Septoria On Carnations – Learn About Carnation Leaf Spot Control

Organic Gardening - Wed, 2019-10-23 18:00
Carnation septoria leaf spot is a common, yet highly destructive, disease that spreads rapidly from plant to plant. The good news is that septoria leaf spot of carnations, which shows up in warm, damp conditions, is relatively easy to manage if caught soon after symptoms first appear. Read on to learn more about carnation septoria symptoms and what you can do about this pesky disease. Recognizing Septoria on Carnations Septoria on carnations is easy to spot by the development of pale brown patches with purple or violet edges. These show up first on the lower part of the plant. Most likely, you’ll also notice tiny black spores in the center of the rings. As the spots enlarge and grow together, the leaves may die. Carnation septoria symptoms may include leaves that bend downward or sideways. Managing Septoria Leaf Spot of Carnations Septoria on carnations is favored by warm, damp conditions

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